John Feffer is director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies.

He is the author, most recently, of Aftershock: A Journey into Eastern Europe’s Broken Dreams (Zed Books). He is also the author of the dystopian novel Splinterlands (Dispatch Books) and its soon-to-be-released sequel Frostlands. He is the author of several other books, and his articles have appeared in The New York Times, Washington Post, USAToday, Los Angeles Review of Books, Salon, and many other publications.

He has been an Open Society fellow, a PanTech fellow in Korean Studies at Stanford University, a Herbert W. Scoville fellow, a writing fellow at Provisions Library in Washington, DC, and a writer in residence at Blue Mountain Center and the Wurlitzer Foundation.

He is a former associate editor of World Policy Journal. He has worked as an international affairs representative in Eastern Europe and East Asia for the American Friends Service Committee. He has studied in England and Russia, lived in Poland and Japan, and traveled widely throughout Europe and Asia.

John has been widely interviewed in print, on radio, and TV.

Learn more about him on his website.

Latest

Chain-Gang Economics

China and the United States are sustaining the global economy. But as FPIF columnist Walden Bello points out, this linked relationship is part of the problem, not part of the solution.

Poll: Fewer Guns, More Talk

FPIF’s new department War and Peace looks at the big picture of how to build a more secure world. In the debut article, Poll: Fewer Guns, More Talk, department editor Miriam Pemberton reports that the votes are already in and the winner is a new foreign policy.

Free Market Famine

Niger is the poorest country in the world. Neither humanitarian aid nor free-market reforms prevented its 2005 food crisis.

Support Peace or Ill Kill You!

Dada wasn’t just strange art from the distant past. As Valery Oisteanu writes, Dada was an international anti-war art movement, and its legacy lives on today.

The Perils of Globeerization

In The Perils of Globeerization, Chris O’Brien argues that beer can literally save the world.

FOG Problems

George Bush is losing some of his best global buddies.

Breaking Up That Old Gang of Mine

A top British military official has called for troop withdrawal from Iraq. Does this mark the beginning of the end of the special military relationship between the White House and 10 Downing Street?

Operation Enduring Freedom: A Retrospective

The war against the Taliban in Afghanistan was more popular than the war against Saddam Hussein. Should it have been?

Clueless Empires

Wisdom can be very powerful, but the powerful are rarely very wise.

The Taliban is Back

Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bush administration, Iraq, Taliban, warlords, drug lords, opium, women’s issues, civilian casualties, corruption

Afghanistan: Five Years Later

The Taliban is back. And the United States is largely to blame.

Beware Empires in Decline

Common sense says that Washington won’t attack Tehran. But columnist Michael Klare questions whether common sense is guiding Bush administration policy.

Oil or Atoms?

In the upcoming U.S. elections, will voters be eyeing the price of gas or the gathering storm over Iran?

Beyond Kyoto

In her comment Beyond Kyoto, Ruth Greenspan Bell seconds the importance of performance standards and discusses the challenges of implementation.

Tehran or Pyongyang?

Washington’s uncompromising tactics with both Tehran and Pyongyang have failed to achieve anything but the most radioactive results.

Global Warming: A Viable Strategy

global warming, climate change, performance standards, emissions, fuel efficiency, China, India, environment, cap and trade, carbon dioxide, 60-Second Expert

War or Rumors of War?

Is Washington planning to attack Iran or just bluffing? Columnist Frida Berrigan reads between the lines of the latest U.S. preparations.

African Fantasies

There is so little room in the American consciousness for Africa.

A New Standard for Preventing Global Warming

In this continuation of an FPIF debate on climate change, Hoff Stauffer argues that the Kyoto model is not going to make a dent in global warming. Stricter standards on factories, autos, and appliances is the better way to go.

The Thai Coup

What’s going on in Thailand, briefly.