John Feffer is director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies.

He is the author, most recently, of Aftershock: A Journey into Eastern Europe’s Broken Dreams (Zed Books). He is also the author of the dystopian novel Splinterlands (Dispatch Books) and its soon-to-be-released sequel Frostlands. He is the author of several other books, and his articles have appeared in The New York Times, Washington Post, USAToday, Los Angeles Review of Books, Salon, and many other publications.

He has been an Open Society fellow, a PanTech fellow in Korean Studies at Stanford University, a Herbert W. Scoville fellow, a writing fellow at Provisions Library in Washington, DC, and a writer in residence at Blue Mountain Center and the Wurlitzer Foundation.

He is a former associate editor of World Policy Journal. He has worked as an international affairs representative in Eastern Europe and East Asia for the American Friends Service Committee. He has studied in England and Russia, lived in Poland and Japan, and traveled widely throughout Europe and Asia.

John has been widely interviewed in print, on radio, and TV.

Learn more about him on his website.

Latest

Reasons Not to Like Ford

He might have been a nice guy. His foreign policy wasn’t.

Shaking Up Bhutan

The fairy tale kingdom of Bhutan is heading toward democracy. Overlooked has been the problem of over 100,000 Bhutanese refugees.

Globalization in Retreat

One world economy ready or not? FPIF columnist Walden Bello argues that globalization has reached its high-water mark and is receding.

Tsunami’s Latest Victims

Two years after the Indian Ocean tsunami, Sri Lanka’s survivors are still fleeing for their lives.

Taiwan’s Independence

China wants Taiwan, Taiwan wants independence, and Ian Williams wants you to know why Taipei has a more compelling argument than Beijing.

Labor Rights in China

China wants to change its labor law in favor of workers and, according to Tim Costello, Brendan Smith, and Jeremy Brecher, foreign corporations are squawking.

Labor in China

The country’s proposed legislation will not eliminate its labor problems.

Dialogue on Laos and Vietnam

Ronald Bruce St John and Andrew Wells-Dang debate the relationship between economic and politics in Laos and Vietnam.

All Talk

Before the recent nuclear test and the famine of the mid-1990s, North Korea engaged in a form of public diplomacy.

Laos: Power Trumps Reform

Without political reform, Laos will continue to be mired in debt and poverty, argues Ronald Bruce St John.

Vietnam: The Changing Faces of Reform

Andrew Wells-Dang questions whether Western capitalism is transforming Vietnam into a neo-liberal paradise.

Taiwan: A Key to Chinas Rise and Transformation

China and Taiwan should unify, Fei-Ling Wang argues, to ensure a peaceful and democratic China.

Postcard from Pyongtaek

Just three hours south of the De-Militarized Zone, the South Korean government is waging alarming levels of violence and repression against villagers in the city of Pyongtaek near the U.S. base Camp Humphrey. For over four years, residents have refused to hand over their homes and farmland to the U.S. military.

Response to Public Diplomacy Dialogue

America’s public diplomacy is handicapped by arrogance, impatience, and a reluctance to listen. In Anti-Americanism and the Rise of Civic Diplomacy, Nancy Snow investigates how Washington can change its image abroad. In their responses to Nancy Snow’s provocative thesis, R.S. Zaharna and John Robert Kelley focus on America’s credibility deficit and the limits of civic diplomacy. Finally, Nancy Snow offers some concluding remarks.

The U.S. Credibility Deficit

In their responses to Nancy Snow’s provocative thesis, R.S. Zaharna and John Robert Kelley focus on America’s credibility deficit and the limits of civic diplomacy.

The Limits of Public Diplomacy

In their responses to Nancy Snow’s provocative thesis, R.S. Zaharna and John Robert Kelley focus on America’s credibility deficit and the limits of civic diplomacy.

Anti-Americanism and the Rise of Civic Diplomacy

America’s public diplomacy is handicapped by arrogance, impatience, and a reluctance to listen. In Anti-Americanism and the Rise of Civic Diplomacy, Nancy Snow asks whether Washington can change its image abroad.

Using India to Keep China at Bay

The U.S.-India nuclear deal does nothing to contain the spread of nuclear technology. But, as Tim Beal argues, that’s not the containment Washington has in mind.

China and Southeast Asia

Beijing is wooing Southeast Asia. Washington can either try to break up the relationship, writes Evelyn Goh, or work out a more peaceable ménage a trois.

Political Football

The clock is ticking. The current strategy doesn’t seem to be working, but Coach Bush is reluctant to try something new.