Peace and Foreign Policy

To build peace, we must dislodge the economic and political foundations of war. IPS believes that a just foreign policy is based on human rights, international law, and diplomacy over military intervention.

Latest Work

Burma

A nonaligned, economically autarkic, one-party state under harsh military rule since 1962, Burma has metamorphosed into a test case for action on several fronts: human rights in Southeast Asia, international trade relations and the World Trade Organization (WTO), the growing worldwide heroin epidemic, and the role of foreign investors in supporting dictatorships.

read more

Investment Funds

Investment funds, established to provide capital for private enterprises and sponsored by government agencies and multinational institutions, are increasing in number every year.

read more

United States Information Agency

The USIA performs the public diplomacy function of U.S. foreign policy through its USIS posts, exchange activities, information programs, and international broadcasting.

read more

Sudan

Sudan’s size, strategic location, and as-yet-unexploited oil reserves made it a cold war target of superpower intervention.

read more

G7 Summit: 1997

The G-7 was formed in 1975 to provide an informal forum for coordination of economic policy among leaders of prominent industrialized nations.

read more

Albania

After the cold war, Albania became a country of strategic importance to the United States.

read more

Export Promotion Programs

Washington’s increasing focus on promoting international investment and trade is evident in the smorgasbord of assistance offered to U.S. exporters.

read more