Our Work

At IPS, our work is centered in our vision: we believe everyone has a right to thrive on a planet where all communities are equitable, democratic, peaceful, and sustainable. Our intersecting programs and initiatives, led by a diverse group of expert staff and associate fellows, are helping to shape progressive movements toward this vision.

Latest Work

Mining Injustice Through International Arbitration

Across the Global South, international mining companies use disturbing tactics to forcibly open mining operations against the wills of local communities.

Spending More on the Military Means Lining the Pockets of Top Defense Industry Executives

Until we address the Pentagon’s revolving door, private corporate interests are always going to be put ahead of public well-being and care.

It Is Time to Levy a One-Time Pandemic Wealth Tax on Billionaires’ Windfall Gains

How we face this extraordinary inequality is the ultimate test of what kind of country we are and what we will become.

Reimagining School Safety Resolution Toolkit

Real school safety means divesting from school resource officers and investing in restorative practices, social development, health, and counseling.

The Fox Is Still in the Henhouse at the Post Office

In the face of a historic public outcry, the postmaster general has promised to stop sabotaging essential services — temporarily.

Ending the School to Prison Pipeline

Many school districts are deciding that police in classrooms cause more problems than they solve.

Call the Victory Women

In a small city in northern New England, one local nonprofit mobilizes to meet the COVID-19 crisis in its New American community.

Are USPS Cuts Motivated by Voter Suppression or Privatization — or Both?

The Postmaster General’s actions are advancing two of President Trump’s goals: undermining confidence in vote by mail and laying a foundation for postal privatization.

Twelve US Billionaires Have a Combined $1 Trillion

A disturbing milestone in the concentration of US wealth.

A Moment of Reckoning for Greed on the Gridiron

If college football programs at public universities can afford to pay their coaches millions of dollars a year, they can afford to do without our subsidies.