Sarah Anderson directs the Global Economy Project at the Institute for Policy Studies and is a co-editor of the IPS web site Inequality.org. Sarah’s research covers a wide range of international and domestic economic issues, including inequality, Wall Street reform, CEO pay, taxes, labor, and international trade and investment. Sarah is a well-known expert on executive compensation, as the lead author of more than 20 annual “Executive Excess” reports that have received extensive media coverage.

During the Obama administration, she served on the Investment Subcommittee of the U.S. State Department’s Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy (ACIEP). In 2009, this subcommittee carried out a review of the U.S. model bilateral investment treaty. In 2000, she served on the staff of the bipartisan International Financial Institutions Advisory Commission (“Meltzer Commission”), commissioned by the U.S. Congress to evaluate the World Bank and IMF. Sarah is a co-author of the books Field Guide to the Global Economy (New Press, 2nd edition, 2005) and Alternatives to Economic Globalization (Berrett-Koehler, 2nd edition, 2004).

Prior to coming to IPS in 1992, Sarah was a consultant to the U.S. Agency for International Development and an editor for the Deutsche Presse-Agentur. She holds a Masters in International Affairs from The American University and a BA in Journalism from Northwestern University.

Latest

Bailouts Dwarf Spending on Climate and Poverty Crises

The approximately $4.1 trillion that the United States and Europe have committed to rescue financial firms is 40 times the money they’re spending to fight climate and poverty crises in the developing world.

The Massive Wealth Redistribution that Doesn’t Bother John McCain

Upward wealth redistribution has taken billions of dollars out of the pockets of average Americans.

Rewrite Bailout Rules on CEO Pay

Paulson’s new plan still sides with the executives and shortchanges the taxpayers.

Analysis of Treasury Department Rules on Executive Compensation for Bailout Firms

Treasury Department’s new rules clarify some provisions in the bailout but fail to set monetary limits for CEO pay.

Truth, Lies, the Bailout, and CEO Pay

The bailout does precious little to limit the extravagant pay that gives top executives the incentive to behave outrageously.

IPS Statement on the Congressional Bailout of Wall Street

Congress needs to address the bailout’s unfinished agenda and fix our broken financial system.

Reaction to Bailout Vote

IPS analysts say Wall Street, not taxpayers, should pay.

IPS Plan to Pay for Recovery

Where to Find $900 Billion from the Wall Street Speculators.

In Wake of Crash, McCain Talks Tough About CEO Pay Will Congress Call His Bluff?

The candidate is proposing a radical restriction on pay for CEOs of bailed-out firms. But is he serious or is this just election season populism?

The Bailout and ‘Greedy’ CEOs

Congress should use the proposed bailout legislation for much-needed reform.

The Bailout and CEO Pay: What’s ‘Excessive’?

Congress should use the bailout to reform executive pay, not maintain it.

Taxpayers Subsidize Billionaire Executives

American taxpayers can no longer foot the bill for the bloated paychecks of U.S. corporate aristocracy.

Workers Need Added Clout to Close the Pay Gap with CEOs

Eroding government regulation and vanishing unions have undermined the values we’re supposed to celebrate every Labor Day.

Executive Excess 2008: How Average Taxpayers Subsidize Runaway Pay

This 15th annual report calculates the annual cost of tax loopholes that encourage excessive executive pay.

Don’t Let Corporations Off the Tax Hook

Taxpayers shouldn’t have to subsidize corporate tax dodgers or bloated CEO salaries.

Politicians Talk Tough About Obscene Executive Pay, But Where Are the Fixes?

Obama and McCain are both taking whacks at overpaid CEOs, but their solutions fall short.

We All Pay for Wall Street

A recent Government Accountability Office study found that two-thirds of U.S. corporations paid no federal income taxes between 1998 and 2005. These same companies reported trillions of dollars in earnings.

Seeking a Sign of CEO Excess? Look Up in the Sky

The private-jet perk is – literally and figuratively – a high-profile sign of an executive reward system out of control.

High Flyers

How private jet travel is straining the system, warming the planet, and costing you money.

Border Crossings: Links Between Immigration, Debt and Trade

Debt cancellation, combined with new approaches to trade, investment, and aid, could help many developing countries reduce migration pressures.