Veteran labor journalist and Institute for Policy Studies associate fellow Sam Pizzigati co-edits Inequality.org, the Institute’s weekly newsletter on our great divides. He also contributes a regular column to OtherWords, the IPS national nonprofit editorial service.

Sam, now retired from the labor movement, spent two decades directing the publishing program at America’s largest union, the 2.8-million-member National Education Association, and before that edited the national publications of three other U.S. trade unions.

Sam’s own writing has revolved around economic inequality since the early 1990s. His op-eds on income and wealth concentration have appeared in periodicals all around the world, from the New York Times to Le Monde Diplomatique.

Sam has authored four books and co-edited two others. His 2004 book, Greed and Good: Understanding the Inequality that Limits Our Lives, won an “outstanding title” honor from the American Library Association’s book review journal. His 2012 title, The Rich Don’t Always Win: The Forgotten Triumph over Plutocracy that Created the American Middle Class, 1900-1970, explores how average Americans ended the nation’s original Gilded Age. Sam’s most recent book, The Case for a Maximum Wage, offers a politically plausible path toward ending that Gilded Age’s second coming.

Latest

Climate-Striking Young People Get Climate Change. Why Can’t Their Elders?

In deeply unequal societies, the rich and powerful never feel the environmental pain.

Harvard, Stanford, and Columbia Each Received Over a Billion Dollars in New Donations Last Year

Inequality in America’s system of higher education runs deep. Here’s why you should care.

A New Statistical Shell Game for Justifying Billionaires

Some daring conservatives are using the successes of Scandinavia to rationalize gran private fortunes.

Helicopter Parenting Linked to Economic Inequality?

China and the United States — two nations notorious for their helicopter parenting — just happen to sport two of the world’s deepest economic divides. Coincidence?

Have the Rich Always Laughed Stiff Tax Rates Away?

Fans of grand fortune want us to believe that the rich have never paid much more of their income in taxes than they do now. History says otherwise.

Taxing the Rich Is Bold — Can It Be Sustainable Too?

Innovative proposals like tying income tax rates for America’s riches to the minimum wage for America’s poorest could help high tax rates survive over the long haul.

The Best Month for Egalitarians on Capitol Hill Since 1932

Those rare moments when our political class suddenly starts viewing the nation’s richest through a skeptical lens can help trigger real social change.

The Beauty Industry Profits from Inequality

In a world where wealth concentrates ferociously, we can’t escape the ugliness our grand divides engender.

The Moderate’s Case for a Maximum Wage

Democrats have enough heft in Congress to force floor debates on proposals that meaningfully target inequality, but they’ll need support from their moderate contingent if any real change is to occur.

The Deep-Pocket Push to Deep-Six Public Schools

The backstory to the showdown in Los Angeles between teachers and billionaires.

When Corporations Pay CEOs Way More Than Employees, Make Them Pay!

Portland’s groundbreaking strategy for curbing executive compensation should be a model for the rest of the country.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Tax Plan Can Get The Rich To Actually Want To Make All Americans Richer. Here’s How.

Linking the top tax rate to minimum wage could be the key to incentivizing wealthy Americans to shrink income inequality.

U.S. Tax Policy Can Turn on a Dime. Has Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Just Turned It?

The youngest lawmaker in Congress delivers a history lesson America has needed for years.

Prices, Plutocrats, and Corporate Concentration

The more industries monopolize, the wider the gap between our richest and everyone else.

Can an Unequal Earth Beat Climate Change?

Some 250 million years ago, life on Earth survived an existential climate crisis. But that Earth had a distinct advantage. No rich.

If Democrats Fracture, This Will Be the Fault Line

Should we treat the super rich as a distraction or a clear and present danger? No question more deeply divides the opposition to The Donald.

What Does Inequality Cost the Average American? About $150K

Americans pay a steep price for not spreading their wealth around as well as other developed countries.

GM, Jobs, and Corporate America’s Incentive to Exploit

Executive pay excess is driving decisions that are turning workers — and their communities — into sacrificial lambs.

The Carcinogens That Come in Pay Envelopes

Cancer-treatment executives are reaping fortunes off deeply misleading marketing strategies.

Some Leveraging Inspiration from Old Archimedes

If that ancient Greek could move the world, we can certainly move Walmart.