Veteran labor journalist and Institute for Policy Studies associate fellow Sam Pizzigati co-edits Inequality.org, the Institute’s weekly newsletter on our great divides. He also contributes a regular column to OtherWords, the IPS national nonprofit editorial service.

Sam, now retired from the labor movement, spent two decades directing the publishing program at America’s largest union, the 2.8-million-member National Education Association, and before that edited the national publications of three other U.S. trade unions.

Sam’s own writing has revolved around economic inequality since the early 1990s. His op-eds on income and wealth concentration have appeared in periodicals all around the world, from the New York Times to Le Monde Diplomatique.

Sam has authored four books and co-edited two others. His 2004 book, Greed and Good: Understanding the Inequality that Limits Our Lives, won an “outstanding title” honor from the American Library Association’s book review journal. His 2012 title, The Rich Don’t Always Win: The Forgotten Triumph over Plutocracy that Created the American Middle Class, 1900-1970, explores how average Americans ended the nation’s original Gilded Age. Sam’s most recent book, The Case for a Maximum Wage, offers a politically plausible path toward ending that Gilded Age’s second coming.

Latest

Tax Day: You Pay Your Taxes — Why Don’t the Rich Pay Their Share?

Few Americans realize just how incredibly little our nation’s wealthy now pay in taxes. Our grandparents seriously taxed the rich. Why can’t we?

Reversing the Great Tax Shift: Seven Steps to Finance Our Economic Recovery Fairly

Tax Day 2009 will come upon a time of financial crisis and extreme economic inequality. The Institute for Policy Studies proposes a series of measures to alleviate both problems.

Beyond the AIG Bonuses

Many taxpayer subsidies for executive excess have not yet hit the headlines.

What Would the Man Who Got Us Out of the Last Depression Do About Wall Street’s Greed?

What would FDR do if he were around to see AIG’s bonus bozos spit in the face of the American taxpayer?

Paying for a Strong Economy

IPS scholars find that taxes on the wealthy don’t hurt consumption, and discourage the type of speculation that fueled the high-tech and housing bubbles.

Obama Is Right to Take on the Very Rich

They’re paying far less of their incomes in taxes than average Americans.

Executive Pay and the Stimulus Bill

This memo summarizes the key provisions in the stimulus legislation to restrict compensation for executives of bailed-out companies.

The CEO Pay Debate: Myths v Facts

This fact sheet sums up and dissects the major arguments against public policy action on CEO pay.

Pay-Cap Populism

Our forebears struggled to survive in a world dominated by the superrich. Now it’s our turn.

IPS on the CEO Pay Caps

We applaud efforts to cap bailout pay, but are concerned about reports of weak Treasury rules.

Executive Pay and the Bailout

An analysis of new proposals for change.

An Epoch Named!

The Nation announces the winner of its “Name our Epoch!” contest.

A Sensible Plan for Recovery

Americans recognize the need to act on our current crisis but detest the idea that ordinary taxpayers should bear the brunt of bailing out the kingpins of Wall Street.

Ike Wanted to Spread Wealth, Too

The wealthy of the Eisenhower years paid a hefty share of their income in taxes.

The Massive Wealth Redistribution that Doesn’t Bother John McCain

Upward wealth redistribution has taken billions of dollars out of the pockets of average Americans.

Rewrite Bailout Rules on CEO Pay

Paulson’s new plan still sides with the executives and shortchanges the taxpayers.

Analysis of Treasury Department Rules on Executive Compensation for Bailout Firms

Treasury Department’s new rules clarify some provisions in the bailout but fail to set monetary limits for CEO pay.

Truth, Lies, the Bailout, and CEO Pay

The bailout does precious little to limit the extravagant pay that gives top executives the incentive to behave outrageously.

IPS Statement on the Congressional Bailout of Wall Street

Congress needs to address the bailout’s unfinished agenda and fix our broken financial system.

Reaction to Bailout Vote

IPS analysts say Wall Street, not taxpayers, should pay.