John Feffer is director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies.

He is the author, most recently, of Aftershock: A Journey into Eastern Europe’s Broken Dreams (Zed Books). He is also the author of the dystopian novel Splinterlands (Dispatch Books) and its soon-to-be-released sequel Frostlands. He is the author of several other books, and his articles have appeared in The New York Times, Washington Post, USAToday, Los Angeles Review of Books, Salon, and many other publications.

He has been an Open Society fellow, a PanTech fellow in Korean Studies at Stanford University, a Herbert W. Scoville fellow, a writing fellow at Provisions Library in Washington, DC, and a writer in residence at Blue Mountain Center and the Wurlitzer Foundation.

He is a former associate editor of World Policy Journal. He has worked as an international affairs representative in Eastern Europe and East Asia for the American Friends Service Committee. He has studied in England and Russia, lived in Poland and Japan, and traveled widely throughout Europe and Asia.

John has been widely interviewed in print, on radio, and TV.

Learn more about him on his website.

Latest

Surging Right Into Bin Laden’s Hands

President Bush wants to up the ante in Iraq and possibly in Iran as well. Guess who the secret admirers of this plan are…

The Vishnu Strategy

The world’s strongest militaries have been raining destruction down on Afghanistan, Iraq, and Lebanon. Why has this strategy not been working?

The Point of Protest

Vol. 2, No. 5

Full Snow Moon

Full Snow Moon, a poem by Melissa Tuckey.

Bush’s SOTU: Annotated

President Bush speaks to the nation and FPIF’s Stephen Zunes speaks back to the president.

Bait and Switch

Vol. 2, No. 4

Reconstructing Iraq

Forget about high-priced foreign contractors and top-down management. Think small. And think local.

Protesting Guantanamo

FPIF columnist Frida Berrigan describes her experience of getting arrested at the Federal District Court building in Washington, DC. The goal: to shut down Guantanamo.

Don’t Mourn: Annotate

On the battlefield of the image, the United States has lost the Iraq War

Burma Strategic Dialogue: Responses

Kaung and Steinberg rebut each other’s arguments.

Minimizing the Miasma in Myanmar

Sanctions have failed their stated goal — regime change. The international community should try diplomacy instead.

Nothing to Laugh At

In Morocco, jokes about Islam are no laughing matter, as two journalists recently discovered.

China’s Filthiest Export

China makes, the world takes. And that includes pollution.

Iran: Thinking the Unthinkable

A rational government would learn the lessons of Iraq and steer clear of attacking Iran. But, alas, irrationality happens…

Is Russia Really That Authoritarian?

The West often perceives Putin’s Russia as a one-man dictatorship, but analysts in Moscow point instead to a startling crisis of corporate management.

A New Era for Turkmenistan?

The new government in Turkmenistan has pledged to continue business as usual after next month’s presidential election, a frightening prospect for human rights activists and anyone concerned about the fate of prisoners of conscience.

Nuking Iran

The headlines this week will be all Iraq, all the time.

Bush to Iraq: More War

With no victory in sight in Iraq, the Bush administration is casting around for another magic word to obscure its dismal policies.