John Feffer is director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies.

He is the author, most recently, of Aftershock: A Journey into Eastern Europe’s Broken Dreams (Zed Books). He is also the author of the dystopian novel Splinterlands (Dispatch Books) and its soon-to-be-released sequel Frostlands. He is the author of several other books, and his articles have appeared in The New York Times, Washington Post, USAToday, Los Angeles Review of Books, Salon, and many other publications.

He has been an Open Society fellow, a PanTech fellow in Korean Studies at Stanford University, a Herbert W. Scoville fellow, a writing fellow at Provisions Library in Washington, DC, and a writer in residence at Blue Mountain Center and the Wurlitzer Foundation.

He is a former associate editor of World Policy Journal. He has worked as an international affairs representative in Eastern Europe and East Asia for the American Friends Service Committee. He has studied in England and Russia, lived in Poland and Japan, and traveled widely throughout Europe and Asia.

John has been widely interviewed in print, on radio, and TV.

Learn more about him on his website.

Latest

How Washington Goaded Israel

Crippling Hezbollah was only the first stage in a U.S.-Israeli plan to remake the Middle East.

A Second Rebirth for East Timor?

Prodded in part by the Bush administration, the UN withdrew from East Timor too early. After several months of violence convulsed the island nation, the UN and the United States now have a second chance to get it right.

Islam’s Two Faces?

The United States, when it looks at Islam, suffers from a peculiar disorder of the eyes that perhaps only the great neurologist Oliver Sacks can properly diagnose. Where there is a great multiplicity of sects, beliefs, and approaches in Islam, the U.S. government has a stubborn double vision.

Why the Dems Have Failed Lebanon

The Democrats are missing yet another golden opportunity to distance themselves from the Bush foreign policy.

Nobel Women’s Initiative

The Nobel Women’s Initiative is trying to reduce the risk of war with Iran.

How the Irish Can Save the Middle East

The Irish saved civilization. Now it’s time for them to help out the Middle East.

Reform or Counterrevolution at the UN?

The glass of UN reform is more than half full, despite the best efforts of the United States and John Bolton.

Islamic Blowback Part Two?

The Bush administration is supporting the reform of Islam from within. But this faith-based approach is undemocratic, ignorant of the complexities of Islam, and ultimately doomed to fail.

Jihad Against Hezbollah

The Bush administration wants to punish the Lebanese for supporting Hezbollah. Who’s next, Syria or Iran?

No Standards, No Accountability

In 1996, the United States designed a law to combat war crimes. That same law has now come back to haunt the Bush administration.

Who’s Arming Israel?

Everyone’s talking about the arms suppliers behind Hezbollah. But who’s supplying Israel?

A New Frontier of Jihadi Islam?

Is Somalia rapidly turning into this year’s Afghanistan, with the Islamic Courts in the role of the Taliban and Ethiopia as the unilateral invader?

Congress and the Israeli Attack on Lebanon: A Critical Reading

The U.S. Congress has backed Israel’s military campaigns in Lebanon and Gaza. Here’s a line by line refutation of the congressional logic.

Gaza and Lebanon: Connecting the Dots

Israel starts a war to gain greater security while the United States backs an attack against two nascent democracies to promote democracy in the Middle East.

The Devil’s Brew of Poverty Relief

Cut global poverty in half by 2015? Not with the current mix of debt relief, U.S. trade policy, bureaucratic inertia, and greedy brokers.

Negotiating Space with North Korea

Even though North Korea’s long-range missile turned out to be a dud, Pyongyang has nevertheless achieved its aim by getting the world’s attention.

Dropping Musharraf?

Pakistan has been a key U.S. ally on counter-terrorism. But it looks like Musharaff may no longer be “our man in Pakistan.”

Democrats Versus the Peace Movement?

Many hope that a Democratic Party victory in November will mark the beginning of the end of the Iraq war. Don’t hold your breath.

Repairing a Broken Iraq

The new Iraqi amnesty plan is designed to end the insurgency and knit together the country. The lessons of 1863 suggest otherwise.

To Link or Not to Link: The Human Rights Question in North Korea

A way forward for human rights in North Korea.

Project Director and Associate Fellow

Epicenter, Foreign Policy in Focus

    Asia/Pacific, Military/Peace, NATO, North Korea, Northeast Asia, South Korea

    America First

    94.1 KPFA | April 7, 2019

    His View: Iran vs. North Korea: Obama got a better deal

    Moscow-Pullman Daily News | July 19, 2018

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