John Feffer is director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies.

He is the author, most recently, of Aftershock: A Journey into Eastern Europe’s Broken Dreams (Zed Books). He is also the author of the dystopian novel Splinterlands (Dispatch Books) and its soon-to-be-released sequel Frostlands. He is the author of several other books, and his articles have appeared in The New York Times, Washington Post, USAToday, Los Angeles Review of Books, Salon, and many other publications.

He has been an Open Society fellow, a PanTech fellow in Korean Studies at Stanford University, a Herbert W. Scoville fellow, a writing fellow at Provisions Library in Washington, DC, and a writer in residence at Blue Mountain Center and the Wurlitzer Foundation.

He is a former associate editor of World Policy Journal. He has worked as an international affairs representative in Eastern Europe and East Asia for the American Friends Service Committee. He has studied in England and Russia, lived in Poland and Japan, and traveled widely throughout Europe and Asia.

John has been widely interviewed in print, on radio, and TV.

Learn more about him on his website.

Latest

“Dealing with the Powers in Pyongyang”

How to deal with North Korea

The Tug of War

The tug of war between the hawks and doves over North Korea policy continues within the Bush administration.

North Korea/South Korea

A detailed look on the history and political complexites of the Korean peninsula.

We’ve Lost Their Hearts and Minds

The war against terrorism is entering its third year, but the U.S. has already lost the most critical battle.

Hexagonal Headache

It is a testament to the absurdly low expectations attached to the diplomatic abilities of both North Korea and the United States that pundits have avoided the obvious conclusion concerning the recently concluded Six-Party Talks in Beijing.

Six Countries in Search of a Solution

In a world dominated by military “solutions” to obdurate problems, even the muted vote for diplomacy represented by the upcoming Six-Party Talks should be cause for celebration.

Fearful Symmetry: Washington and Pyongyang

In the fun house of mirrors in which contemporary global politics is enacted, a strange resemblance has developed between George W. Bush and Kim Jong Il and between their respective war parties.

Eyes on Different Prizes

Publicly, the South Korean president will affirm his government’s desire to strengthen its relationship with the United States and bring a peaceful end to the nuclear crisis with North Korea.

Is North Korea Next?

With the war launched in Iraq, the Bush administration appears to be laying the groundwork for its next move: an attack on North Korea.

Power Trip: U.S. Unilateralism and Global Strategy After September 11

Leading progress experts provide ways in which we can move the country back in the right direction.

South Korea Joins the Axis of Independence

Roh is facing even longer odds in the international arena, as he is simultaneously trying to establish peace with North Korea and negotiate a more just relationship with the United States.

The Time-Out Method Doesn’t Work

For the past two years, the Bush administration has treated North Korea like a child throwing a tantrum.

Osama bin Laden’s Secret Strategy

Bin Laden’s secret strategy is to prod the United States into bankruptcy.

Militarization in the Age of Globalization

In the aftermath of the September 11 tragedies, arms production and sales worldwide will likely continue their upward trajectory–encouraged by national policies and supported by multilateral economic institutions.

Bush Faces Challenges on the Korean Peninsula

The Bush administration faces challenges from allies and adversaries alike in East Asia.

Containment Lite: U.S. Policy Toward Russia and Its Neighbors

Instead of consulting with Russia over key foreign policy issues such as the Iraq bombings and allied policy toward former Yugoslavia, Washington has attempted to steer Moscow into a diplomatic backwater where it can exert little global influence.

U.S.-North Korea Relations

The Pentagon has inflated the North Korean threat in order to rationalize its desire for a missile defense system, to justify a capacity to fight two wars simultaneously, and to explain the need to maintain 37,000 troops in South Korea.

Restructuring East-Central European Economies

In promoting structural adjustment, the U.S. has concentrated on short-term profits for businesses and narrow diplomatic gain.

U.S. and the Former Yugoslavia: Improving on Dayton

When war erupted in the former Yugoslavia in 1991, the U.S. kept its distance.

The Costs and Dangers of NATO Expansion

With the end of the cold war and the demise of the Soviet threat, NATO must find new rationales for its existence.

Project Director and Associate Fellow

Epicenter, Foreign Policy in Focus

    Asia/Pacific, Military/Peace, NATO, North Korea, Northeast Asia, South Korea

    America First

    94.1 KPFA | April 7, 2019

    His View: Iran vs. North Korea: Obama got a better deal

    Moscow-Pullman Daily News | July 19, 2018

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