John Feffer is director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies.

He is the author, most recently, of Aftershock: A Journey into Eastern Europe’s Broken Dreams (Zed Books). He is also the author of the dystopian novel Splinterlands (Dispatch Books) and its soon-to-be-released sequel Frostlands. He is the author of several other books, and his articles have appeared in The New York Times, Washington Post, USAToday, Los Angeles Review of Books, Salon, and many other publications.

He has been an Open Society fellow, a PanTech fellow in Korean Studies at Stanford University, a Herbert W. Scoville fellow, a writing fellow at Provisions Library in Washington, DC, and a writer in residence at Blue Mountain Center and the Wurlitzer Foundation.

He is a former associate editor of World Policy Journal. He has worked as an international affairs representative in Eastern Europe and East Asia for the American Friends Service Committee. He has studied in England and Russia, lived in Poland and Japan, and traveled widely throughout Europe and Asia.

John has been widely interviewed in print, on radio, and TV.

Learn more about him on his website.

Latest

Wall Street (Unlike)

They occupied their squares to defeat tyrants; we occupy our squares to defeat the tyranny of business as usual.

Why 2012 Will Shake Up Asia and the World

Can Washington move from Pacific power to Pacific partner?

Fear of an Islamic Planet

Is political Islam poised to “hijack” the Arab Spring, and why does that scare so many people?

Review: The Survival of North Korea

If North Korea isn’t about to collapse, then policymakers must stop complaining and deal with it.

Dale Carnegie of the Middle East

Turkey is winning friends and influencing the Middle East, but its Dale Carnegie approach doesn’t extend to Israel.

Libya and the Bully Problem

How does the principle of “first do no harm” come up against the problem of ruthless leaders?

Did 9/11 Make Peace Passe?

The U.S. Institute for Peace wants to change its name. What’s the matter with peace all of the sudden?

Al-Qaeda Lost the Battle Long Ago

The terrorist network’s resort to dramatic spectacle was at once a brilliant tactic and a desperate effort to revive its own fortunes.

Governments Kill

Governments kill on our behalf. This arrangement is a form of social contract, which means that governments are basically contract killers.

Feeding the World

With evermore mouths to feed, how will we be able to coax more food out of our exhausted soil?

Con Game

Has the U.S. economy turned into a pyramid scheme?

Debt and Empire

Congress is cutting left and right. Will they also cut empire?

Norway: The Enemy Within

The Oslo terrorist took aim at multiculturalism, not Muslims.

Third Prize: You’re Fired

President Obama is trying to sell free trade agreements as win-win deals. The problem is that most people will only win dubious prizes.

Foreign Policy Goes Gaga

Celebrities are going global in their activism. But are they doing the right thing?

Art v. State

Ai Weiwei has challenged the Chinese authorities with his art and his Tweets — who will win this political tug-of-war?

Ten Little Republicans

The foreign policy of the Republican presidential candidates — in verse.

A Politician Who Distinguishes Fact from Fiction

Jim Webb would make a great Secretary of Defense.

Webb’s Parting Shots

While Robert Gates is spreading his soothing fictions about the U.S. military, Jim Webb is raising some uncomfortable facts.

Bunkum and Debunk ‘Em

Preferring Occam’s Hairball to Occam’s Razor, conspiracy theorists draw strength from their deep-seated distrust of government and the mass media.

Project Director and Associate Fellow

Epicenter, Foreign Policy in Focus

    Asia/Pacific, Military/Peace, NATO, North Korea, Northeast Asia, South Korea

    America First

    94.1 KPFA | April 7, 2019

    His View: Iran vs. North Korea: Obama got a better deal

    Moscow-Pullman Daily News | July 19, 2018

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