John Feffer is director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies.

He is the author, most recently, of Aftershock: A Journey into Eastern Europe’s Broken Dreams (Zed Books). He is also the author of the dystopian novel Splinterlands (Dispatch Books) and its soon-to-be-released sequel Frostlands. He is the author of several other books, and his articles have appeared in The New York Times, Washington Post, USAToday, Los Angeles Review of Books, Salon, and many other publications.

He has been an Open Society fellow, a PanTech fellow in Korean Studies at Stanford University, a Herbert W. Scoville fellow, a writing fellow at Provisions Library in Washington, DC, and a writer in residence at Blue Mountain Center and the Wurlitzer Foundation.

He is a former associate editor of World Policy Journal. He has worked as an international affairs representative in Eastern Europe and East Asia for the American Friends Service Committee. He has studied in England and Russia, lived in Poland and Japan, and traveled widely throughout Europe and Asia.

John has been widely interviewed in print, on radio, and TV.

Learn more about him on his website.

Latest

Are We Incapable of Ending Wars?

In a world awash with weak states, powerful weapons, and crumbling institutions, conflicts can easily continue for generations — and perhaps never end.

The Mad Hatters of Poland’s Tea Party Movement

By embracing a neoliberal, pro-austerity agenda, Poland’s mainstream left opened the way for a government of Polish Ted Cruzes.

Darkness at High Noon in Korea

South Korea severed its last important economic link with the North, as governments on both sides of the DMZ extinguish what little remained of the “sunshine era” of engagement.

The Art of Dissidence and Diplomacy

Foreign policy is too important to leave to the “professionals.” Through art and culture, we can all work to make the world a better place.

Wrestling with Iran

Wrestling is the new ping pong when it comes to U.S.-Iranian relations.

East Asia Is Invisible

East Asia is invisible to the average American — for better and worse.

The Candidate Our Foreign Policy Deserves

Our foreign policy is aggressive, parochial, and hard-hearted. Unless voters finally demand differently, our next president will be the same.

Life in the Gray Zone

While ISIS makes war on the world’s vast majority of “moderate Muslims,” hardliners in the West pretend they don’t exist.

Iran and the Diplomatic Jackpot

The Middle East is hardly a cheery place these days. But there’s one silver lining: The Iran deal is paying off big.

Wrestling with Wrestling Jerusalem

A powerful new solo show on the Israel-Palestine conflict presents the sounds of one man wrestling.

Africa’s Success Story

Diamond-rich Botswana avoided the dreaded resource curse and established a prosperous, stable democracy. But political turmoil has begun to roil the traditionally placid society.

The Geopolitics of Cheap Oil

Economists said the market would save the planet. It didn’t.

Obama: The Fairy-Tale President?

Obama’s made a lot of Faustian bargains over the last seven years. But given his likely successors, what we got over the last two terms may be as good as it gets.

Syria: Mission Possible

There’s no grand, exciting solution to the war in Syria. It’s going to take an endless parade of meetings where people sit and talk. And talk. And talk.

Burma: Democracy with an Asterisk?

Burma’s constitution awards a quarter of its parliament to the military. But that’s not Aung San Suu Kyi’s biggest problem by a long shot.

The Schrodinger Solution for Syria

The only sensible solution to the Syrian crisis is a quantum one in which Bashar al-Assad is simultaneously there and not there.

What Comes After Empire?

Let’s say the U.S. actually curbed its military adventurism, reeled in the Pentagon budget, and closed its global network of bases. Then what?

A Kumbaya Moment for the Middle East? Hardly.

Despite Washington’s move toward detente with Iran, other regional conflicts — especially in Israel-Palestine, where an “intifada of knives” is underway — are looking as volatile as ever.

Is Putin Really as Foolish as We Are?

Putin’s attempt at “shock and awe” in Syria has all the hallmarks of failed U.S. interventions of the past

Mouth Wide Shut

Under Obama, whistleblowers face a total of 751 months behind bars — compared to 24 months for all other whistleblowers combined since the American Revolution.

Project Director and Associate Fellow

Epicenter, Foreign Policy in Focus

    Asia/Pacific, Military/Peace, NATO, North Korea, Northeast Asia, South Korea

    John Feffer on NATO and the War in Ukraine

    KPFA UpFront | March 21, 2022

    The Pandemic Pivot

    C-SPAN | May 6, 2021

    America First

    94.1 KPFA | April 7, 2019

    His View: Iran vs. North Korea: Obama got a better deal

    Moscow-Pullman Daily News | July 19, 2018

    More...