John Cavanagh has been Director of the Institute for Policy Studies since 1999. He directed IPS’ Global Economy Program from 1983-1997. Cavanagh is the co-author of 12 books and numerous articles on a wide range of social and economic issues. He co-authored (with Richard J. Barnet) Global Dreams: Imperial Corporations and the New World Order, which sold over 60,000 copies with Simon & Schuster. Cavanagh co-led a 24-person team to create the International Forum on Globalization book Alternatives to Economic Globalization, which sold over 20,000 copies and was translated into 12 languages.

Cavanagh sits on the boards of the Congressional Progressive Caucus Center, the International Forum on Globalization, International Labor Rights Forum, the Fund for Constitutional Government, and the New Economy Coalition.

Cavanagh worked as an economist for the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (1978-1981) and the World Health Organization (1981-1982). He served on the Civil Society Advisory Committee of the UN Development Program (2000-2012). He received a Bachelor degree from Dartmouth College, and a Masters from Princeton University.

Latest

Ideas into Action in Durban

This week, IPS is taking its ideas to the UN Climate Change Summit in South Africa.

A Main Street Fix to Wall Street’s Failure

Building a policy agenda to deepen the jobs debate, our new report looks at the structural issues behind the economic crisis and how we can transition to a new economy based on Main Street.

A Main Street Jobs Agenda

Putting more money in the hands of those who already have jobs so they can buy more Chinese imports does very little to put Americans to work in good jobs that pay good wages.

How Occupy is Transforming Our National Conversation

In just two months, the Occupy movement has begun to unseat an economic narrative that held sway for thirty years.

America Is Not Broke

How to pay for the crisis while making the country more equitable, green, and secure.

The 99 Percent Have Found Our Voice

These are days of action in more than 400 occupied places across the nation. As we change the national conversation, we can dismantle the barriers to change.

Occupy Wall Street, 1979 Edition

Before there were hashtags, 32 years ago, more than a thousand protesters tried to shut Wall Street down for a day.

Occupy Wall Street’s Deep Roots

If Howard Zinn were alive today, he’d be writing a new chapter right now.

WIN America Coalition Seeks to Pad Pockets with “Tax Holiday”

Tax holiday proponents have delivered losses to American workers.

From Arab Spring to Wisconsin to Wall Street to October 12

The roots of this new social movement trying to “occupy everything” reach deep into the soil of Egypt and Wisconsin, and lead us into honoring our heroes of activism.

America Loses: Corporations That Take “Tax Holidays” Slash Jobs

Some of America’s most flush corporations are demanding a tax holiday on their profits sitting offshore. But the last holiday produced a nasty hangover.

Heroes Fighting to Save the Middle Class: Wisconsin’s Progressives

The Institute for Policy Studies recognizes Wisconsin’s progressive movement with the prestigious Letelier-Moffitt Human Rights Award.

Will Obama’s Push for Jobs Lead to a New Economy?

Back from sabbatical, our director reflects on the challenged of the day and how the Obama administration can face them.

Obama’s Job Speech: The Good, the Bad, and the Missing

Obama’s jobs plan is his great opportunity to both pay for vital programs and make this country fairer.

Gold or Water? A Deadly Debate in El Salvador Mines

To protect their water supply, Salvadorans are trying to ban corporate gold mining – and facing threats and violence as a result.

Reframing Development in the Age of Vulnerability

Rootedness could be key to enhanced well-being for communities and countries in the 21st century, given the Achilles heel of vulnerability.

Like Water for Gold in El Salvador

The story of a community’s effort to ban gold mining in El Salvador involves environmental martyrs, powerful economic interests, and a DC-based tribunal that can trump democracy.

An Appeal to U2: Who is More Rooted?

Anti-poverty crusaders like Bono call critical attention to what’s wrong with the world. But what if we also showed who’s doing it right?

The Road Not Built: Redefining Progress At Home and Abroad

Local opposition to a proposed road in Trinidad brings new understanding of “progress,” and what it means to be rooted.

We Can Live Without Gold

A Salvadoran community activist makes the case for prioritizing water over gold, as his ongoing struggle against the gold mining industry is rewarded.